History 427: History of the Information Age

HIST 427: Citations and Misinformation

Last week in History of the Information Age we discussed the importance of citations, and misinformation (or willful ignorance) in the digital age.

The most vibrant portion of last week’s discussion was by far each table’s discussion of their favorite citation style. As a class of mostly history majors, including myself, Chicago style was most certainly everyone’s favorite citation style. We argued that Chicago style is the most inclusive, information-heavy style, and therefore superior as Chicago style provides the reader with the most information possible about sources.

Furthermore, I learned something new about citations at the secondary level. I learned that the reason that students learn MLA before any other citation style is because, at least in the State of Virginia, the research education requirement follows not under the purview of History teachers, but rather, English teachers. As a result, many of my classmates and I reminisced about the oddly cobbled-together, MLA-formatted “research” papers we created in our junior and senior years of high school. As a history major and future social studies teacher myself, I believe that many students who benefit far more from writing their research papers in Chicago style than MLA-style.

Finally, to end our discussion of citations, each group created a Canva info graphic delineating their favorite citation style. In an attempt to be edgy and different, our group created our info graphic on APA, a style used for concise, technical writing.

Info graph created by my group members and I using Canva. APA is far better suited for highly technical writing.

(As an aside, we would like to thank Dr. McClurken for later tweeting our group’s info graph alongside the Chicago style info graphs. We understand that our chosen citation style is not preferable. /s)

Citations create a on-going dialogue between the author, the readers, and other scholars within the field. Citations, in addition to preventing plagiarism, represent an active, living discourse -a discourse which is, of course, best held in Chicago style.

Citations

Anderson, Janna, Lee Rainie, Janna Anderson, and Lee Rainie. “About This Canvassing of Experts.” Pew Research Center: Internet, Science & Tech. October 19, 2017. Accessed April 02, 2019. https://www.pewinternet.org/2017/10/19/the-future-of-truth-and-misinformation-online-about-this-canvassing-of-experts/.

CBS News. CBS News. April 24, 2018. Accessed April 06, 2019. https://www.cbsnews.com/video/new-video-technology-stokes-fears-of-fake-news/.

Chapter 1 of McIntyre, Lee C., and McIntyre, Lee C. Respecting Truth : Willful Ignorance in the Internet Age. 2015. https://doi-org.umw.idm.oclc.org/10.4324/9781315713168

Karcher, Sebastian, and Philipp Zumstein. “Citation Styles: History, Practice, and Future.” Authorea. October 04, 2018. https://www.authorea.com/users/102264/articles/124920-citation-styles-history-practice-and-future/_show_article.

Karcher, Sebastian, and Philipp Zumstein. “Citation Styles: History, Practice, and Future.” Authorea. October 04, 2018. https://www.authorea.com/users/102264/articles/124920-citation-styles-history-practice-and-future/_show_article.

McAlpine, Kat J. “In the Fake News Era, Native Ads Are Muddying the Waters” Boston University. December 21, 2018. https://www.bu.edu/research/articles/native-advertising-in-fake-news-era/

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